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HDZETA Spartacus (1960) (HDZeta Silver Label Exclusive #55) (WWA 4K UHD Only Steelbook) [China]


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6 hours ago, DodgyDave said:

I must admit that a 60 year old film is probably pushing “timeless classics” to the limit. 
We will be getting silent movies next ! 9_9

 

Hey @DodgyDave,

 

I’m a good “60+” am I considered an ol’ “timeless classic” too now! 🤣

 

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767229034_Homer-LastPerfectMan.thumb.jpg.0655c3421880c06781257376ff4d15f1.jpg

 

Anyway Spartacus is a fantastic film 🎬 and I’m very much excited/thankful that it is getting a Premium exclusive here on MP, thank you HDZeta/MP!! 😘

 

EA980E92-84ED-499B-AE81-1F48BA203BEC.gif.708d844a5019d6ee8e10a8ae6cfeff6e.gif

 

49609E72-C9AF-4A90-B741-CFFF5F5AF9B2.gif.d194e92b5e302f968a48964323ab0d71.gif

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On 10/23/2019 at 9:38 AM, DodgyDave said:

I must admit that a 60 year old film is probably pushing “timeless classics” to the limit. 
We will be getting silent movies next ! 9_9

Is spartacus, not a silent movie but one that leaves you speechless. 

or at least did to me. 

The great Kirk deserves it. If you ask me I would push it to the limit of... gold label 😌

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On 10/23/2019 at 4:38 AM, DodgyDave said:

I must admit that a 60 year old film is probably pushing “timeless classics” to the limit. 
We will be getting silent movies next ! 9_9


Star Wars is a 47 year old movie. So....

Great movies will always be great movies, no matter when they were made.

 

 

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On 10/23/2019 at 3:38 AM, DodgyDave said:

I must admit that a 60 year old film is probably pushing “timeless classics” to the limit. 
We will be getting silent movies next ! 9_9

 

Well, I have a few Silents in mind I'd grab in a heartbeat should they get a Premium release. 😉

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11 minutes ago, Grendel said:

Actually @Mad-martigan;

There's also this Steel, which could potentially also be the one used. 🙂

(yes, I have them both, as well as the Crit releases) 😉

 

Spartacus (Limited Edition Steelbook) [Blu-ray + Digital HD]

ummm, too much blood and not enough sand 😉 

well, is HDzeta, they will make it up with the slip 

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9 minutes ago, Grendel said:

 

Well, I have a few Silents in mind I'd grab in a heartbeat should they get a Premium release. 😉

 

 

Here’s a couple @Grendel I’d go for, yeah!😊

 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Director John S. Robertson

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

 

The famous Shakespearean John Barrymore shoulders the dual roles of man and monster in this hugely popular adaptation of the Robert Louis Stevenson novella. Fellow stage thespian Brandon Hurst plays Jekyll’s leering colleague Dr Carew, while vamp Nita Naldi is the dance-hall darling who brings out his inner Hyde. And all the while the intertitles ramp up the tension, they are also casting a moral burden out to the audience: “In each of us, two natures are at war – the good and the evil. All our lives the fight goes on between them, and one of them must conquer. But in our own hands lies the power to choose.”

Barrymore’s own hands, extended by gruesome, gnarled fingers, are a tribute to Famous Players-Lasky’s makeup department, but there’s far more to this than gore and shocks. The final scenes capitalise on a new character inserted by a previous stage adaptation, Jekyll’s fiancée Millicent, to add a little heartbreak to the horror.

 

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Director Rupert Julian

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Lon Chaney was known as the man of a thousand faces, most of which were grotesques. Here he uses his makeup skills to transform himself into the deformed ‘Phantom’ skulking around the lower quarters of the Paris Opera.

Contemporary reports said that audience members fainted and screamed when the Phantom was unmasked, revealing a corpse-like face with deep eye sockets, receding lips and gaping nostrils. For Chaney, playing such terrifying roles had a social purpose. “I wanted to remind people that the lowest types of humanity may have within them the capacity for supreme self-sacrifice,” he wrote in the year this film was released. “The dwarfed, misshapen beggar of the streets may have the noblest ideals.” And it is a hard-hearted viewer who fails to sympathise with the malevolent Phantom, just a little.

Rupert Julian’s movie was troubled during production and shot and reshot following poor reviews. As such, it’s a movie made by Hollywood committee, but nevertheless enjoyable in its garish gothic excesses. One of the most memorable sequences is the two-strip Technicolor ‘bal masqué’, in which the Phantom makes a glorious appearance wearing a skull mask and red velvet cloak.

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8 minutes ago, Mad-martigan said:

any reason I cannot give more likes to a reply??


@Mad-martigan

 

It’s because regular members have a limit put on how many positive reactions they can give in a single day. You would have to become a premium member (silver, gold or platinum) to be able to give as many reactions as you like.

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36 minutes ago, Veum said:
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Here’s a couple @Grendel I’d go for, yeah!😊

 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Director John S. Robertson

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

 

The famous Shakespearean John Barrymore shoulders the dual roles of man and monster in this hugely popular adaptation of the Robert Louis Stevenson novella. Fellow stage thespian Brandon Hurst plays Jekyll’s leering colleague Dr Carew, while vamp Nita Naldi is the dance-hall darling who brings out his inner Hyde. And all the while the intertitles ramp up the tension, they are also casting a moral burden out to the audience: “In each of us, two natures are at war – the good and the evil. All our lives the fight goes on between them, and one of them must conquer. But in our own hands lies the power to choose.”

Barrymore’s own hands, extended by gruesome, gnarled fingers, are a tribute to Famous Players-Lasky’s makeup department, but there’s far more to this than gore and shocks. The final scenes capitalise on a new character inserted by a previous stage adaptation, Jekyll’s fiancée Millicent, to add a little heartbreak to the horror.

 

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Director Rupert Julian

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Lon Chaney was known as the man of a thousand faces, most of which were grotesques. Here he uses his makeup skills to transform himself into the deformed ‘Phantom’ skulking around the lower quarters of the Paris Opera.

Contemporary reports said that audience members fainted and screamed when the Phantom was unmasked, revealing a corpse-like face with deep eye sockets, receding lips and gaping nostrils. For Chaney, playing such terrifying roles had a social purpose. “I wanted to remind people that the lowest types of humanity may have within them the capacity for supreme self-sacrifice,” he wrote in the year this film was released. “The dwarfed, misshapen beggar of the streets may have the noblest ideals.” And it is a hard-hearted viewer who fails to sympathise with the malevolent Phantom, just a little.

Rupert Julian’s movie was troubled during production and shot and reshot following poor reviews. As such, it’s a movie made by Hollywood committee, but nevertheless enjoyable in its garish gothic excesses. One of the most memorable sequences is the two-strip Technicolor ‘bal masqué’, in which the Phantom makes a glorious appearance wearing a skull mask and red velvet cloak.


42D79C43-0024-45E5-B026-A930F2B3ED6B.thumb.jpeg.6e0269276309f438d90ed85ee3c0b49e.jpeg

 

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8 minutes ago, Hollywood E Rock said:


@Mad-martigan

 

It’s because regular members have a limit put on how many positive reactions they can give in a single day. You would have to become a premium member (silver, gold or platinum) to be able to give as many reactions as you like.

I was about to hit the "like" bottom to your comment 🙄

I got it, thank you. here you have 👍

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4 minutes ago, Grendel said:

It's Flicker Alley buddy @C.C. 95,

of course I have it on order...🙂

everything they do...is remarkable...

I was lucky enough to see a Nitrate print of Edwin Carewe’s 1928 film Ramona at the 2016 Nitrate film festival.

wish Flicker would get that one out (as you know, shrunken nitrate prints get “x” amount of runs through a projector before it’s too far gone).

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^^ Indeed!

Ramona would be an incredible coupe!

I watched a doc showing what it took for FA to salvage;

"A Trip To The Moon"

 

Trip to the Moon/Extraordinary Voyage

 

An absolutely herculean effort that took months, just to separate the nitrate film strips from a solid block they had congealed into.

Absolutely amazing.

One of my most treasured films in my collection. 🥰

( note: they once more had to hand paint the individual coloured cells to restore it).

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8 hours ago, Grendel said:

 

Well, I have a few Silents in mind I'd grab in a heartbeat should they get a Premium release. 😉

Please NO.

It was only a joke. The last thing I need is retailers digging up silent movies because they can't find anything else, and the licences are cheap.  ;)

 

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  • extantsrevenge changed the title to Spartacus (1960) (HDZeta Silver Label Exclusive #55) (WWA 4K UHD Only Steelbook) [China]

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