Jump to content
Scary Hair

Physical Media Age Rating

Recommended Posts

Age ratings exist for a reason  yet sometimes we have let the childabeasts view things rated older than there actual years on view at  home physical media .

 

I remember viewing The Thing , The Terminator , Galaxy Of Terror  , Mad Max saw all and others for the first time under age . Hell some of them before age rating came in and the phrase Video Nasty being introduced , YES I AM THAT OLD 🤣🤣

 

Ours quickly pointed out that " on the internet you can watch what you want "

 

We have always conscious of bad language and inappropriate content and taken decisions on a movie by movie  basis👍 😁.

 

Now they are 18 and 16 it's a relief that no longer is screening content before they view a must .

 

After all if they don't like it there is always a pillow or sofa to hide behind OR an off button .

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Scary Hair That’s a good and important topic. When I joined MP I didn’t realize that a lot of the members here are actually grown ups with kids (in some ways it was a relief to learn that the art of Premium collecting was not restricted to teenagers and twenty something geeks).

I learned a long time ago not to base my decisions as to what my daughter should or shouldn’t watch on ratings (or what is perceived as the general consensus), but rather on my instinct as a parent. My daughter is almost seven but has the intellectual maturity of a 10 year old (not bragging, a school psychologist recently confirmed what we already suspected).

As such I didn’t deem inappropriate showing her films that other parents may feel reluctant to show kids at the same age.

Recent examples are some Bond movies (mostly Moore as they are more light hearted), ‘Little Shop Of Horrors’ and ‘Amadeus’ which she absolutely adored and has since rewatched (the full director’s cut).

What I think is most important is to sit with your children when you try and show them a film which might be ‘risky’ and gauge their reaction. Only by doing so can we truly know what is appropriate viewing for our children.

Edited by R1s1ngs0n
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@R1s1ngs0n

 

One thing we always did was make sure that a line was drawn between actor and character. 

 

 

Also how the movie or TV  is made helped them understand more scary things when they where little .

 

Dr Who Fear Her  episode  was terrifying.  Yet they saw it was the effects guys banding a door open and closed while turning a light with a red bulb on and off .

 

After that both became a lot more interested in behind the scenes. 

 

So much so our boy is doing Media as his course in September as he wants to go into Cinematography  as a job .

 

Your Young Lady  will have a fantastic start in life being introduced to amazing movies to widen her viewing horizons 😊❤❤💋💋 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Scary Hair @R1s1ngs0n,

 

I'm glad I was brought up when I was, because we grew up on the Universal Classic Monsters (with no ill effects BTW!)! vampire.gif

 

Every Friday/Saturday night my mom (this is after my dad had already passed, I was 8 icon_sad.gif) would have us make our pallets of blankets in the living room and she would make Jiffy Pop popcorn with our sodas and we would watch our favorite Ghoul host SAMMY TERRY put on those classic monsters! icon_biggrin.gif

 

Very precious and happy memories for us! icon_smile.gif

 

eb27f52ffb07d7a96f9fc503bf104ee3.jpg&f=1 il_570xN.352598190_nzny.jpg&f=1 1960s_pepsi_bottles.jpg&f=1 

 

cd5d69ec0b5c08c53fd57e0ebcda6bb6.jpg&f=1 

 

stack-of-soft-vintage-acrylic-bed-blanke

 

IMG_4926.jpg&f=1

 

il_570xN.806757659_9nfm.jpg&f=1

 

 

maxresdefault.jpg&f=1 

 

sammy-terry-promo02.jpg&f=1  

 

sammy-terry-promo14.jpg&f=1

 

 

Boo.jpg&sp=231726252e72de3bc36226be94b3d

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  

3 hours ago, Hollywood E Rock said:


@Casiusco

 

This I whole heartily agree with. The parental technique of giving children a false reality to live in until they’re a certain age has proven to be dangerous & short sighted. It’s no wonder that society has trouble moving forward when we are improperly preparing the children of the future.

 

 

 

@Mad-martigan

 

You are right when you say the core from a child’s early life will remain in their adult life & this is why it’s important not to shelter children from the truths of the world. If children are not properly prepared to deal with all the traumas life will throw at them they will have a hard time navigating through their adult years.

 

Parents shouldn’t worry about ensuring a safe transition “without traumas” into the adult world. The focus should be on ensuring a safe transition where a child understands & knows how to deal with the traumas that may come their way. 
 

Trauma is a part of life that can’t be avoided, so there isn’t a reason to shelter children from it when they are at the stage in their life when they are the most receptive to learning. Once you become an adult it’s hard letting go of earlier programming & most of the programming humans get in their early years are lies.

 

 

Quote

Same here, as a kid I watched all kinds of crazy a$$ movies & my parents used the movies as teachable moments, because even though a lot of these movies had fantasy elements they still had moments where they mirrored real life. 

 

 

Children are tougher, & smarter, than what adults give them credit for. I say children can handle these movies pretty early on in age as long as an adult took real time out to properly explain situations without sugar. Kids are so receptive that if you give them enough examples they would understand “adult themes” just fine. Kids are only naive because adults train them to be that way. 

 

 

Any option when it comes to the television can be dangerous for a child to consume without proper adult guidance. 
 

P.S. I replied to you guys comments here in this thread because I wasn’t staying on subject. This area is better suited for this topic.

 

I completely agree with you. In each and every one of the points you have written.

 

The first to limit children are their parents. And the second, the educational system. Against the educational system it's difficult to do something effective, but parents do have an individual responsibility. And they prefer to have their children living in that false reality, because they have also false beliefs, contradictory fears, or because they are not aware of the potential of their children; but often also for laziness. Because sitting down to watch an "inappropriate" movie with your child means guiding him, talking to him.  Make her/him aware of the perspective in front of them, and its nature.

 

In fact, today children live in an audiovisual world, where the truth is in the images. But they have no visual education, no one teaches them to understand images beyond distinguishing them, and parents have a responsibility to develop those skills so that they won't be audiovisual illiterates. Like those old people who read but did not understand, and used to accept blindly.

 

And if we talk about cinema, we have several generations of children who will not be able to enjoy many titles that opened our eyes. Of one genre or another, of one type or another. And the important thing is not that they don't know this films, which is negative in artistic terms, but -more important- that they don't have references to open their scope.

 

Because today in the audiovisual mainstream nobody's horizon is widened. People are only moved to the next stage of consumption. And, although with a correct guide there's no "bad content", we are in an era where children watch more hours of television alone. 

 

It is another habitual contradiction: parents who don't want to let them to watch certain types of movies, but let them watch television without limits, and use the smartphone freely. Without any guidance.

 

 

@Hollywood E Rock @Mad-martigan   

 

Do you think this is applicable only at a logical/intellectual level, or also emotionally? Let me explain: I think we can agree that any content -films of all decades and genres- with the right guidance can be good -or not bad- for children. Intellectually it opens their eyes to the real world, and prevents them from living in a bubble. But on an emotional level, should there be any limits? Or can the same rule apply?

 

 

PS: Talking about to guide childs, thank you for guiding us to this thread, @Scary Hair ;)  That way we don't break the usual way of other threads.

 

 

Edited by Casiusco
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


What makes us different

Media Psychos is a community dedicated to bringing together Media collectors from all over the world.
In addition to offering Group Buys at cost, as well as Premium memberships and many more perks which are exclusive to our site, we pride ourselves on being a community where members are happy to discuss their shared passion as well as many other topics.

Come in and have a look, we guarantee you’ll be here to stay.

Get in touch

Have any questions ? Ask one of our Guardians they are happy to help.

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Privacy Policy